Reaveley
RELIGIOUS

Mexico City Mexico LDS Temple Seismic Upgrade & Renovation Phases I and II

Constructed in the early 1980s, the Mexico City Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is comprised of structural steel braced frame and concrete shear walls. Although the structure performed adequately during an earthquake in 1985, fears of a closer seismic source prompted a comprehensive seismic evaluation of the building in 2005. Reaveley Engineers evaluated the building and proposed methods for reinforcing the structure to resist the effects of a large earthquake.

The primary reinforcement strategy was to ensure that braced frame connections had the capacity to develop the full yield strength of seismic braces. This approach meant adding a series of cover plates to connections in order to increase capacity beyond the expected yield strength of the braces themselves. An innovative approach for cladding using a lighter weight GFRC meant that seismic loads could be reduced by virtue of reducing total structural mass.

Phase I work consisted of a seismic upgrade, interior remodeling, and an exterior skin replacement; this involved removing and replacing 57,500 square feet of exterior precast concrete panels. The interior work included a new entrance to and remodel of the baptistry, remodel of the main lobby, sealing and ordinance rooms, and some of the corridors. A 25,000 sf visitor center was also remodeled.

Phase II comprised a complete MEP upgrade as well as renovating the architectural finishes in the baptistry and instruction areas.

CATEGORY

Religious

YEAR

2008, 2015

LOCATION

Mexico City, Mexico

SQUARE FOOTAGE

113,500

SHARE PROJECT
  • CATEGORY : Religious
  • YEAR : 2008, 2015
  • LOCATION : Mexico City, Mexico
  • SQUARE FOOTAGE : 113,500